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Künker Auction Nets Over $11 Million With Only 721 Lots

The first auction sale of the 50th anniversary year for Künker opened 2021 in a big way. Traditionally, the flagship auction at the end of January takes place with large international participation during the World Money Fair in Berlin. But with the WMF out of the picture this year, Künker had to hold the auction in private with just a small group of employees due to the current COVID-19 restrictions.

Nevertheless, all Künker customers had the chance to bid in the way they prefer. Written note, phone or live bidding by the computer were all available options and all were used. The result speaks for itself. 721 lots realized a total of about $11 million dollars. All coins that made the top ten in hammer price were sold for figures in the six-digit range. It was an amazing start of this anniversary year for Künker.

Still, the firm would like to return to live auction as soon as circumstances allow. Andreas Kaiser of Künker said, “An auction is the best opportunity for us to meet our customers. As soon as possible, Künker auction sales will take place in the real world once again.”

Ulrich Künker, who manages his families firm added. “It’s really nice that there are all these virtual possibilities, however, it’s something different to be present in the auction room and take part in the bidding process. We already want to invite you to the on-site auctions we will hold as soon as we are allowed to do room auctions again.”

Our preview for this auction ran in the February issue of World Coin News and you can refer back to that for additional highlights, but for this recap we will concentrate on some coins of the highest individual hammer prices in the auction. Interestingly the lead coin of our preview turned out to be the top grossing coin of this recap.

The first large gold coin issued from a German State, the 6 gold guilders of Hamburg, dated 1505, is the only known example in private hands. It realized $534,500 just about 10% over its presale estimate. I love that kind of accuracy!

This unique Hamburg multiple unit gold piece last appeared at auction in 2007 at LHS’s 100th auction. LHS was the successor to Bank Leu’s numismatic auction division which produced many sales of such high quality and completeness that they remain as references in many numismatic libraries to this day. In that 2007 auction, the coin realized over $190,000. One could say that this coin provided a good investment by any measure.

The remaining six coins we wanted to feature in this article are illustrated here with captions to explain their importance. I’ve included hammer prices, all of which are reflections of the high state of active bidding in the current rare coin market.

Ferdinand of Bavaria graces this 3 reichstaler of the Bishopric of Münster struck in 1638. In about XF this rarity hit a hammer of $166,300.

Ferdinand of Bavaria graces this 3 reichstaler of the Bishopric of Münster struck in 1638. In about XF this rarity hit a hammer of $166,300.

This Nuremberg 1698 5 ducats struck for the one year anniversary of the Peace of Ryswick in stunning FCD condition, NGC MS63, realized triple its estimate to hammer down at roughly $142,500.

This Nuremberg 1698 5 ducats struck for the one year anniversary of the Peace of Ryswick in stunning FCD condition, NGC MS63, realized triple its estimate to hammer down at roughly $142,500.

It is likely there are only two surviving examples of this equestrian portugalöser or 10 ducat struck in 1711 under Frederick Augustus I of the Saxony-Albertine line. Hammer price reached just over $260,000.

It is likely there are only two surviving examples of this equestrian portugalöser or 10 ducat struck in 1711 under Frederick Augustus I of the Saxony-Albertine line. Hammer price reached just over $260,000.

Russian coins are always in the spotlight these days so this gold 10 roubles of Elizabeth struck at St. Petersburg and punch market by well-known collector Count Hutten-Czapski rose well above its estimate, not surprisingly, to close for roughly $249,500.

Russian coins are always in the spotlight these days so this gold 10 roubles of Elizabeth struck at St. Petersburg and punch market by well-known collector Count Hutten-Czapski rose well above its estimate, not surprisingly, to close for roughly $249,500.

Unlisted in the Standard Catalog of World Coins and considered a medallic issue by some, this Sigismund III 10 ducat of 1629 is a real rarity with two known, one of which is in a museum. It realized approximately $332,600 in this first Künker auction of 2021.

Unlisted in the Standard Catalog of World Coins and considered a medallic issue by some, this Sigismund III 10 ducat of 1629 is a real rarity with two known, one of which is in a museum. It realized approximately $332,600 in this first Künker auction of 2021.

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We congratulate Künker Münzauktionen on this grand beginning to their 50th year in the coin business and wish them 50 more. As 2021 continues, Künker has plans for several more auctions, including the following; a March 22 to 26 Spring Auction, a June 28 to July 2 Summer Auction and a Fall Auction from September 27 through October 1. Visit their website at www.kuenker.de/en for more details.