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Doubled large cent not listed anywhere

I want to know if there is any precedent for an 1818 Coronet Head cent with a doubled die at the reverse on AMERICA. I found one on a coin I bought a couple of months ago. I can’t find any variety in this year with a doubled die.

There is a doubled obverse die variety of the 1818 Coronet cent. However I didn’t find any reverse doubled die variety in my search. Without physically seeing your coin I can only suggest it could be doubling due to strike, or you might have a previously unidentified reverse variety. The best way to find out is to send the coin to a well-recognized third party certification service for examination.

clinicvert

The Braided Hair large cent (top) and the Flying Eagle small cent (bottom).

I understand it currently costs more than face value to produce our one-cent coin. What about the large cent? How could that have been economically feasible?

It often wasn’t. That is why in 1857 we switched to a small cent. In 1795, two years after cent production began, U.S. Mint Director Elias Boudinot wrote it cost several cents to strike a one-cent coin. The Mint would later use scrapped barrel hoops used to make coins to keep costs down.

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