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Only a 2013 nickel left to find

Collectors have now found all circulating denominations except the nickel with 2013 dates, though I have yet to have anyone report a find of a 2013 coin from  the Denver Mint.

If you want a little blog fame as the first one to report a 2013 nickel, let me know as soon as you find one. So far it has eluded collectors.

After posting my Monday blog on the find of the first 2013 cent in the Atlanta area by Richie Stinchcomb, two reports followed in quick succession.

The irony is the two arrived in order of their mintage, though the writers of the emails apparently found them on the same date.

On Feb. 12 in an email to me, Brian K. Higgins reported receiving a 2013-P dime in change on Feb. 6 in Naples, Fla. This as you might remember from Monday is one of 224.5 million 2013 and 2013-D dimes struck in January.

The next day it was reported that two 2013-P White Mountain quarters were found Feb. 6 in New York City. The combined Philadelphia and Denver mintage in January was 179.4 million coins. The sender signed his email “Man.”

So what of nickels?

There were 128.88 million of those struck in January. Get cracking and get hunting for one.

And if we want to extend the fun, report your finds of 2013 Denver coins. I will be happy to give you credit.

Buzz blogger Dave Harper is editor of the weekly newspaper “Numismatic News.”

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3 Responses to Only a 2013 nickel left to find

  1. hharrison says:

    I think the first spouse coins would be much more popular if they were more affordable. After all the Presidential coins are just $1 (or a bit more now that they’re produced for collectors only), whereas the first spouse coins are roughly one-thousand times as much. There is the copper medallion companion version but it is not a legal tender issue, which inspires my curiosity when I see them referenced as “uncirculated”. Since when do medals circulate? Perhaps the first spouse coins could be reduced to $5 size for the remainder of the series, or struck in a golloid alloy that reduces the amount of gold drastically but still maintains coin size, spousal face size to match the rest of the series, and face value. While they’re touted as bullion, they’re really commemoratives, and by the mintage figures and sales demand over the past couple of years, no one is buying them as tradeable bullion.

  2. ChasVoice says:

    You may get your answer here:
    Are You Ready to Join the Nickel Hoarders?
    http://chasvoice.blogspot.com/2012/09/blog-post.html

  3. tattoo666 says:

    Not sure what the big deal is. I am sitting here looking at a 2013 Nickel with the Denver mark on it.
    So what is so special about it? I have probably spent many of them at stores.

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