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More than a $10,000 decision

I began coin collecting when I was a kid.

What if on that fateful day my mother had been told that what I was undertaking would cost $10,000?

She probably would have hustled me out of the hobby shop right there and then, leaving the brand-new Whitman folders on the counter.

Happily for me, I was off on the adventure of my life, and no such statement was made to my mother about costs.

We collectors have been having internal discussions about the future of numismatics.

What will bring newcomers in?

Certainly telling them that it will cost a lot of money will not help our cause.

But the statement is true.

In point of fact, I have spent more than $10,000 on coins in the past 50 years.

So many zeroes might be shocking at first, but in the 55 years I have been collecting, that works out to an annual average of $181.81.

In point of fact, I have spent much more of my time in the hobby.

But all those affordable purchases I have made from time to time add up.

Some of those buys have gone way up in value.

Some have plummeted.

On average, though, I am feeling quite happy with my numismatic involvement.

So how about you?

Are you happy with your life choice?

Have you been spending more than $181.81 a year on it? I hope so.

To think I would be limited to less than the cost of a three-coin commemorative coin set each year would have frightened me more than the $10,000 figure would have scared my mother.

Buzz blogger Dave Harper won the Numismatic Literary Guild Award for Best Blog for the third time in 2017 . He is editor of the weekly newspaper “Numismatic News.”

 

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One Response to More than a $10,000 decision

  1. Bob says:

    I’m not anywhere near $10,000 yet, but I’m probably 2-3 decades behind you in time as well. It sounds like a lot of money, but hearing folks talk at coin shows and such, there are many big spenders out there that have easily hit or exceeded that amount.

    Of course if you look at it from the flip side, that’s 50 cents a day. Many folks probably spend more than that on their cup of morning coffee or going to see ball games, etc. At the end of the day, they might have had a little more fun, but you have an investment, or something to pass along to your children and/or grandchildren.

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