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Gold by several names

Memory can be a funny thing. This is especially true if I find myself heading for the bedroom or the basement to do something or retrieve something and then I momentarily forget why I headed in those directions in the first place.

A poll question that went out in Krause numismatics’ Oct. 5 e-newsletter shows that I am not the only one who has temporary memory lapses.

The question I asked was based on an astounding online auction achievement at www. GreatCollections.com Sept. 30.

It was: “An MS-70 2009 $20 Saint sold for $21,000, eight times the MS-65 price. Is it worth it?”

As you might guess, the price surprised people.

A small number seemed to become confused by the brevity forced by a need to keep the question short. There was a story in the e-newsletter that spelled out details of the coin, that is was an Ultra High Relief Saint-Gaudens $20 gold piece created in 2009 from original Saint-Gaudens plaster models.

The auction winning coin was an Professional Coin Grading Service grade of MS-70 Prooflike First Strike – a rare coin indeed with a population of 26 out of the nearly 114,427 minted.

One response I received was, “First of all it is a 2009 Eagle. It is not a Saint and no it is not rare enough to be worth the premium.”

I replied briefly, “Thanks for your response. FYI, it is a Saint.”

I expected the matter to end there, but it didn’t. I received another email.

“It is an American Eagle thank you very much.”

Uh oh, the alarm bells started sounding in my mind. I wasn’t intending to start an argument. I did not reply.

However, a few minutes later another email came in, “or did they rename them for 2009? I will confess that I have not even looked at the bullion coins from the Mint in some time, but a rose by any other name …”

Still I did not reply.

Then three minutes later another email.

“o(r) they did rename it or did a special minting. Thanks for the update. That might change my view. How many were minted. the ultra high relief might change the color of my ‘rose.’”

I did reply to this one with, “A few more than 114,000 were minted and sold to collectors.”

In about 15 minutes the whole thing was over.

When I get to the bedroom, I usually remember to pick up my car keys or in the basement I recall it was the hammer or saw I was going there for.

So it is with coins.

Buzz blogger Dave Harper is editor of the weekly newspaper “Numismatic News.”

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2 Responses to Gold by several names

  1. Tom Snyder says:

    Thanks for admitting you’re in our club. At least the dues are cheap.

  2. hrlaser says:

    “Memory can be a funny thing. This is especially true if I find myself heading for the bedroom or the basement to do something or retrieve something and then I momentarily forget why I headed in those directions in the first place.”.. once or twice, I’ve needed to go somewhere, and went nuts trying to find my car keys which are on a huge keychain.. I looked here, I looked there.. they weren’t in any of the usual places I put them (I have since stuck a pushpin into the side of a table, and every time I came in from the car and put away food or whatever, I try to remember to hang the keychain on the pushpin).. in a couple of cases of running around looking for them, THEY WERE IN MY HAND!.. this is known as “A Senior Moment”.. it can often be caused by eating too much of Senior Moment’s Mexican food.. ;-) ..

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