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Getting serious about lunch

When you work in this field long enough, you notice some strange coincidences that tie one to thing to another through the years.

I had that experience yesterday.

I once wrote a column about lunch. It was a metaphor about the collector impulse. Some people feel it and understand what we collectors do. Some people don’t feel it and never really have a clue why we do what we do.

I asked how you would explain lunch to aliens who did not know hunger and did not eat as we humans do.

It was one of those odd ideas that popped into my head in the mid 1990s.

I have also mentioned lunchtime experiences at the Crystal Cafe to help illustrate a point or two through the years.

Well, yesterday I had a call from the Mint. What was the topic? You guessed it: lunch.

No it wasn’t an invitation.

It was to let me know that the Mint has discovered that it has been paying employees for lunch when it should not have been. It is a longstanding policy and it will be changed by the Sept. 27 pay period, which is the first for the new fiscal year.

This will allow employees who are used to the arrangement to make alternative schedules and plans for the workdays, which will be a half hour longer.

So here I am writing about lunch – seriously.

Who’d have thought it?

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3 Responses to Getting serious about lunch

  1. Mr. Chuck Schroeder says:

    Antone can tell a good story at lunch Dave, some can tell it better then you.

    As coin collector’s are we fed up yet?.

    For years we have all thrown our fishing gear into hinged tackle boxes with worm proof drawers and pre-selected bait storage trays that were more suited for nuts and bolts than fishing tackle. Worm proof, does such a thing really exist? Just what does worm proof mean anyhow? Did any of you have worms trying to break into your tackle boxes? I remember my plastic worms being a huge congealed ball of goo each time I wanted one. How about those hooks? Were they ever where you put them, or did they have a mind of their own and move to the tackle trays to snare space with your lures, leaders, and other gear? Ring any bells?. Now let’s talk about these grading companies for a bit here to. Are those plastic air tights PVC free and acid free etc?. Do they melt as well, when put next to other plastics, hard or soft?. I never really trusted them. Remember those rubber bands you had in that jar covered, and you needed one several months later, they to are all stuck together, in a ball. This gets better here as well. Let’s go on. I know it may be better to get coins in a slab and graded also, so they say, I don’t care what third party grading company ones sends them to, one could get it back then send it to a different one and it comes back with a lower or higher grade, plus the background you can request whatever you like to have on it, any word’s you like it to read, any pictures on them, and a host of other thing’s also, in other word’s they are not consistent, as they should be, other then the bar code and grade. That gets very confusing and the ANA don’t regulate it, because they really can’t tell another business what to do. No more then AAA can tell you how to drive. Now, let’s talk about coin books, you put coins into also, I really don’t care what ones they are, there’s only holes in them for a PDS or PDSS coin, where’s the holes for a complete book?. For example, let’s look at the Presidential $1 Coin that started in 2007. You have the ones each bearing the S mint mark of the United States Mint at San Francisco. Included in this set are four Presidential $1 Coins honoring past Presidents of the United States, you have the satin finish ones in the United States Mint Uncirculated Coin Set, you have the P and D business strike ones, you have the type 2’s, that flipped over and was struck that way, you have the error coins to. This comes to more then just a PDS filled hole. Why don’t these so called EXPERTS talk about this?. Dealer’s selling in-complete books. Grading companies not adding these into that set. Nor calling them for what they are. It’s time I added my 2 cents worth. I have been reading Numismatic News for years. Now, it’s my turn. The negativism of non licensed coin dealers, and real coin dealers. Do you think cherrypicking is pretty much the same as stealing?. Or should people be allowed to benefit from their superior knowledge, as long as they pay the dealer the price he wants for the coin, or wishes to give to you for spot price to melt down when selling it to them?. As most people are aware, the price of gold has reached record levels (from fear of loss and hype), and is currently flirting with $1,000 an ounce. Silver has more than tripled in just over 3 years, rising from $6.40 in Jan. 2005 to about $20 an ounce today. Pawn shops, jewelry stores, and so called coin dealers are all doing a very brisk business in buying gold and silver coin items from customers who want to cash in. Most of this gets melted down and/or resold fairly quickly at a real high price over gray sheet in a market like this. But should coin dealers be melting down the very treasures they are charged to protect and conserve for future generations of collectors?. Are some coins okay to melt but not others?. Personally, I am appalled at this mass melting of U.S. coinage. Perhaps this is an attitude found more commonly among the collectors of ancient coins than the modern coin collectors, but I see coin collectors and dealers as stewards of our national heritage. Not phony con-artist’s. These coins can never be replaced, and coin collectors have a duty to conserve and protect this heritage to pass down to future generations. After all, we can’t take them with us when we die, so melting them for bullion is just selfish and antisocial. On the other side of the coin, however, are the folks who believe that if you pay for the coin, you own it. It’s yours to do whatever you want with it, even destroy it by tossing it into the melting pot. It’s bad enough Coin Club’s are disappearing at an alarming rate, like the drive in movie places, use to be years ago, how is our children of today, going to find that coin, to put in a empty hole in a book, when the silver coins are all melted down for 10 times face, that gave some coin dealer 77 ounces of silver for $100 face value of silver coins and, kills the knowledge of what coin collecting is all about, "Children", and our hobby, and The Family.

  2. Mr. Chuck Schroeder says:

    With the HIGH COST of us doing business with the US Mint, and the high profit’s they make off of us, "still lower then buying from a ad in the paper", they have to give some sort of a kick-back, to the worker’s, and feed them as well, so we can buy coins from them, because they bank’s sure don’t have them in their vaults, thanks to Congress and the Fed’s.

    Yes Dave, some can tell a story better then you do, however, I tell it like it is and tell the full truth’s to here, do you?.

    Let’s go fishing for more truth’s here.

    As coin collector’s, are we fed up yet?.

    For years we have all thrown our fishing gear into hinged tackle boxes with worm proof drawers and pre-selected bait storage trays that were more suited for nuts and bolts than fishing tackle. Worm proof, does such a thing really exist? Just what does worm proof mean anyhow? Did any of you have worms trying to break into your tackle boxes? I remember my plastic worms being a huge congealed ball of goo each time I wanted one. How about those hooks? Were they ever where you put them, or did they have a mind of their own and move to the tackle trays to snare space with your lures, leaders, and other gear? Ring any bells?. Now let’s talk about these grading companies for a bit here to. Are those plastic air tights PVC free and acid free etc?. Do they melt as well, when put next to other plastics, hard or soft?. I never really trusted them. Remember those rubber bands you had in that jar covered, and you needed one several months later, they to are all stuck together, in a ball. This gets better here as well. Let’s go on. I know it may be better to get coins in a slab and graded also, so they say, I don’t care what third party grading company ones sends them to, one could get it back then send it to a different one and it comes back with a lower or higher grade, plus the background you can request whatever you like to have on it, any word’s you like it to read, any pictures on them, and a host of other thing’s also, in other word’s they are not consistent, as they should be, other then the bar code and grade. That gets very confusing and the ANA don’t regulate it, because they really can’t tell another business what to do. No more then AAA can tell you how to drive. Now, let’s talk about coin books, you put coins into also, I really don’t care what ones they are, there’s only holes in them for a PDS or PDSS coin, where’s the holes for a complete book?. For example, let’s look at the Presidential $1 Coin that started in 2007. You have the ones each bearing the S mint mark of the United States Mint at San Francisco. Included in this set are four Presidential $1 Coins honoring past Presidents of the United States, you have the satin finish ones in the United States Mint Uncirculated Coin Set, you have the P and D business strike ones, you have the type 2’s, that flipped over and was struck that way, you have the error coins to. This comes to more then just a PDS filled hole. Why don’t these so called EXPERTS talk about this?. Dealer’s selling in-complete books. Grading companies not adding these into that set. Nor calling them for what they are. It’s time I added my 2 cents worth. I have been reading Numismatic News for years. Now, it’s my turn. The negativism of non licensed coin dealers, and real coin dealers. Do you think cherrypicking is pretty much the same as stealing?. Or should people be allowed to benefit from their superior knowledge, as long as they pay the dealer the price he wants for the coin, or wishes to give to you for spot price to melt down when selling it to them?. As most people are aware, the price of gold has reached record levels (from fear of loss and hype), and is currently flirting with $1,000 an ounce. Silver has more than tripled in just over 3 years, rising from $6.40 in Jan. 2005 to about $20 an ounce today. Pawn shops, jewelry stores, and so called coin dealers are all doing a very brisk business in buying gold and silver coin items from customers who want to cash in. Most of this gets melted down and/or resold fairly quickly at a real high price over gray sheet in a market like this. But should coin dealers be melting down the very treasures they are charged to protect and conserve for future generations of collectors?. Are some coins okay to melt but not others?. Personally, I am appalled at this mass melting of U.S. coinage. Perhaps this is an attitude found more commonly among the collectors of ancient coins than the modern coin collectors, but I see coin collectors and dealers as stewards of our national heritage. Not phony con-artist’s. These coins can never be replaced, and coin collectors have a duty to conserve and protect this heritage to pass down to future generations. After all, we can’t take them with us when we die, so melting them for bullion is just selfish and antisocial. On the other side of the coin, however, are the folks who believe that if you pay for the coin, you own it. It’s yours to do whatever you want with it, even destroy it by tossing it into the melting pot. It’s bad enough Coin Club’s are disappearing at an alarming rate, like the drive in movie places, use to be years ago, how is our children of today, going to find that coin, to put in a empty hole in a book, when the silver coins are all melted down for 10 times face, that gave some coin dealer 77 ounces of silver for $100 face value of silver coins and, kills the knowledge of what coin collecting is all about, "Children", and our hobby, and The Family.

  3. Mr. Chuck Schroeder says:

    Did you ask them at lunch, if we’ll get our order’s faster now?.

    2009 Scheduled Products Listing

    The following list displays the United States Mint’s 2009 products and their dates of availability. This list will be updated periodically as dates for products being released later in the year have yet to be set. All dates are subject to change by the United States Mint without prior notice.

    Availability Date Product Description
    1/5/2009 United States Mint 2009 District of Columbia & U.S. Territories Quarters Proof Set™
    1/15/2009 Native American $1 Coin Rolls
    1/22/2009 2009 Ultra High Relief Double Eagle Gold Coin
    1/22/2009 Kennedy Half-Dollar Bag and Two-Roll Set
    1/26/2009 District of Columbia Bags and Two-Roll Set
    2/10/2009 2009 United States Mint Presidential $1 Coin Proof Set™
    2/12/2009 Abraham Lincoln Commemorative Silver Dollar
    2/19/2009 William Henry Harrison $1 Coin Rolls
    3/5/2009 First Spouse Series One-Half Ounce Gold Proof Coin – Anna Harrison
    3/5/2009 First Spouse Series One-Half Ounce Gold Uncirculated Coin – Anna Harrison
    3/13/2009 2009 Lincoln Cent Two-Roll Set “Birthplace”
    3/17/2009 William Henry Harrison $1 Coin Cover
    3/19/2009 Anna Harrison Bronze Medal 1 5/16”
    3/23/2009 United States Mint 2009 District of Columbia & U.S. Territories Quarters Silver Proof Set™
    3/26/2009 Louis Braille Bicentennial Silver Dollar
    3/30/2009 Puerto Rico Bags and Two-Roll Set
    4/2/2009 2009 Presidential $1 Coin Uncirculated Set (P&D)
    4/7/2009 United States Mint Presidential $1 Coin & First Spouse Medal Set™ – William Henry Harrison
    4/24/2009 District of Columbia Official First Day Coin Cover
    4/30/2009 Multi-Lens Collector’s Box
    4/30/2009 5-Pack Dividers for Multi-Lens Collector’s
    5/14/2009 2009 Lincoln Cent Two-Roll Set “Formative Years”
    5/19/2009 United States Mint 2009 District of Columbia and U.S. Territories Quarters Program Map
    5/21/2009 John Tyler $1 Coin Rolls
    5/26/2009 Puerto Rico Official First Day Coin Cover
    5/26/2009 Guam Bags and Two-Roll Sets
    6/1/2009 2009 United States Mint Proof Set®
    7/1/2009 First Spouse Series One-Half Ounce Gold Proof Coin – Letitia Tyler
    7/1/2009 First Spouse Series One-Half Ounce Gold Uncirculated Coin – Letitia Tyler
    7/1/2009 Letitia Tyler Bronze Medal 1 5/16”
    7/2/2009 John Tyler $1 Coin Cover
    7/14/2009 United States Mint Presidential $1 Coin & First Spouse Medal Set™ – John Tyler (Letitia Tyler)
    Summer Guam Official First Day Coin Cover
    Summer 2009 United States Mint Uncirculated Coin Set®
    Summer 2009 United States Mint Silver Proof Set™
    Summer First Spouse Series One-Half Ounce Gold Proof Coin – Julia Tyler
    Summer First Spouse Series One-Half Ounce Gold Uncirculated Coin – Julia Tyler
    Summer Julia Tyler Bronze Medal 1 5/16”
    Summer American Samoa Bags and Two-Roll Set
    Summer United States Mint Presidential $1 Coin & First Spouse Medal Set™ – John Tyler (Julia Tyler)
    Summer 2009 Lincoln Cent Two-Roll Set “Professional Life”
    Summer James K. Polk $1 Coin Rolls
    Summer American Samoa Official First Day Coin Cover
    Fall First Spouse Series One-Half Ounce Gold Proof Coin – Sarah Polk
    Fall First Spouse Series One-Half Ounce Gold Uncirculated Coin – Sarah Polk
    Fall Sarah Polk Bronze Medal 1 5/16”
    Fall United States Mint Presidential $1 Coin & First Spouse Medal Set™ – Sarah Polk
    Fall James K. Polk $1 Coin Cover
    Fall U.S. Virgin Islands Bags and Two-Roll Set
    Fall U.S. Virgin Islands Official First Day Coin Cover
    Fall 2009 Lincoln Cent Two-Roll Set “Presidency”
    Fall Zachary Taylor $1 Coin Rolls
    Fall Northern Marianas Islands Bags and Two-Roll Set
    Winter First Spouse Series One-Half Ounce Gold Proof Coin – Margaret Taylor
    Winter First Spouse Series One-Half Ounce Gold Uncirculated Coin – Margaret Taylor
    Winter Margaret Taylor Bronze Medal 1 5/16”
    Winter Zachary Taylor $1 Coin Cover
    Winter United States Mint Presidential $1 Coin & First Spouse Medal Set™ – Margaret Taylor
    Winter Northern Mariana Islands Official First Day Coin Cover
    Winter First Spouse Four-Medal Set
    TBD 2009 American Buffalo One Ounce Gold Proof Coin

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