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Deliveries speed up

Collectors are generally fair when it comes to evaluating the performance of the U.S. Mint, though newcomers to the hobby might wonder about it after being exposed to collector comments about the Mint in recent months. This year the Mint has not been receiving good marks from its customer base.

There have been long waits for certain products and sellouts that prevented some buyers from getting what they ordered at all.

This is certainly a headache for the U.S. Mint.

Good news, though, seems to be that deliveries of the two-roll sets of the Lincoln Formative years cents have been occurring very rapidly and I am receiving e-mails and letters telling me of this fact.

Does this mean the tide is turning in the Mint’s favor? Are whatever problems and glitches there were now over? I hope so.

Complaints are a useful function for anybody in the business world because nobody is perfect. Complaints help find and fix weaknesses. But airing them in public as collectors do might raise an eyebrow or two among noncollectors who might stumble into our discussions.

Life cannot be all public relations, but it doesn’t hurt to keep an eye on the public relations impact of dissatisfied Mint customers so that we can continue to correct problems and thrive as a hobby.

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3 Responses to Deliveries speed up

  1. jay says:

    hi dave
    i first ordered the "lincoln formative yrs pennies" on the day it went on sale. i am from hawaii and the eta of my coins seems to be in mid june. im tracking where they are, and they are somewhere in encino california. i guess they will be arriving by boat! lol

  2. Mr. Chuck Schroeder says:

    Sorry Dave, but the full truth’s needs to come out now. It’s time I added my 2 cents worth. I have been reading Numismatic News for years. Now, it’s my turn. The negativism of non licensed coin dealers, and real coin dealers. Do you think cherrypicking is pretty much the same as stealing?. Or should people be allowed to benefit from their superior knowledge, as long as they pay the dealer the price he wants for the coin, or wishes to give to you for spot price to melt down when selling it to them?. As most people are aware, the price of gold has reached record levels (from fear of loss and hype), and is currently flirting with $1,000 an ounce. Silver has more than tripled in just over 3 years, rising from $6.40 in Jan. 2005 to about $20 an ounce today. Pawn shops, jewelry stores, and so called coin dealers are all doing a very brisk business in buying gold and silver coin items from customers who want to cash in. Most of this gets melted down and/or resold fairly quickly at a real high price over gray sheet in a market like this. But should coin dealers be melting down the very treasures they are charged to protect and conserve for future generations of collectors?. Are some coins okay to melt but not others?. Personally, I am appalled at this mass melting of U.S. coinage. Perhaps this is an attitude found more commonly among the collectors of ancient coins than the modern coin collectors, but I see coin collectors and dealers as stewards of our national heritage. Not phony con-artist’s. These coins can never be replaced, and coin collectors have a duty to conserve and protect this heritage to pass down to future generations. After all, we can’t take them with us when we die, so melting them for bullion is just selfish and antisocial. On the other side of the coin, however, are the folks who believe that if you pay for the coin, you own it. It’s yours to do whatever you want with it, even destroy it by tossing it into the melting pot. It’s bad enough Coin Club’s are disappearing at an alarming rate, like the drive in movie places, use to be years ago, how is our children of today, going to find that coin, to put in a empty hole in a book, when the silver coins are all melted down for 10 times face, that gave some coin dealer 77 ounces of silver for $100 face value of silver coins and, kills the knowledge of what coin collecting is all about, "Children", and our hobby, and The Family.

    Mr. Chuck Schroeder
    St Petersburg, Florida

  3. Mr. Chuck Schroeder says:

    I am happy a 3rd party, non-government party, shipping company, under contract, got up off their butts, to ship faster, however, when the coin’s are held-up in the vaults, at the P and D as well as the S mints, and, THEY did NOT get them to this company, and ship them to them, you are calling the kettle black, when it’s the fault of the US Mint. Quit whining, ask the Banking Committee in the US Senate, to shut down that "LiL Store", at the US Mint for good. Then people will not whine so much. They’ll have to get coins’s from their local bank. That’s the cure. They just want them to melt anyway. They could care less. Don’t cha know. all copper, gold and silver coin’s should be melted?. No matter who makes them. It’s time I added my 2 cents worth. I have been reading Numismatic News for years. Now, it’s my turn. The negativism of non licensed coin dealers, and real coin dealers. Do you think cherrypicking is pretty much the same as stealing?. Or should people be allowed to benefit from their superior knowledge, as long as they pay the dealer the price he wants for the coin, or wishes to give to you for spot price to melt down when selling it to them?. As most people are aware, the price of gold has reached record levels (from fear of loss and hype), and is currently flirting with $1,000 an ounce. Silver has more than tripled in just over 3 years, rising from $6.40 in Jan. 2005 to about $20 an ounce today. Pawn shops, jewelry stores, and so called coin dealers are all doing a very brisk business in buying gold and silver coin items from customers who want to cash in. Most of this gets melted down and/or resold fairly quickly at a real high price over gray sheet in a market like this. But should coin dealers be melting down the very treasures they are charged to protect and conserve for future generations of collectors?. Are some coins okay to melt but not others?. Personally, I am appalled at this mass melting of U.S. coinage. Perhaps this is an attitude found more commonly among the collectors of ancient coins than the modern coin collectors, but I see coin collectors and dealers as stewards of our national heritage. Not phony con-artist’s. These coins can never be replaced, and coin collectors have a duty to conserve and protect this heritage to pass down to future generations. After all, we can’t take them with us when we die, so melting them for bullion is just selfish and antisocial. On the other side of the coin, however, are the folks who believe that if you pay for the coin, you own it. It’s yours to do whatever you want with it, even destroy it by tossing it into the melting pot. It’s bad enough Coin Club’s are disappearing at an alarming rate, like the drive in movie places, use to be years ago, how is our children of today, going to find that coin, to put in a empty hole in a book, when the silver coins are all melted down for 10 times face, that gave some coin dealer 77 ounces of silver for $100 face value of silver coins and, kills the knowledge of what coin collecting is all about, "Children", and our hobby, and The Family.

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