Author Archives: Alan Herbert

1827 quarter proofs technically medals

A confusing problem: Some sources list the 1827 quarters as regular issues, some as proofs, including the one sold in the Garrett sale. Please clear this up. Continue reading

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Nickel designs didn’t overlap in 1938

As nearly as I can find, the last Buffalo nickels were struck at Denver in early 1938, legally completing the 25-year requirement. Schlag’s design for the Jefferson nickel was not accepted until late July, so production would not have started until later in the year, meaning the two did not overlap. Philadelphia switched to the new Jefferson design, proofs and circulation strikes in 1938; Denver switched later in the year. Continue reading

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Majority of steel cents eluded Mint

The U.S. Mint began withdrawal in 1945, and in 20 years retrieved 163 million, or about 14.9 percent of the steel cents in circulation. Some 900,000,000 are still out there. Apparently they were turned over to private smelters to be melted down. Continue reading

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War nickels loophole in melting ban

From 1965 to 1967 it was illegal to melt any of the 90 percent silver coins but the lawmakers ignored the war nickels, apparently assuming that their 35 percent silver wasn’t worth bothering with. The smelters took advantage of this loophole and melted millions of them, right along with a lot of 90 percent silver that was claimed to be from Canadian coins. Continue reading

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1873 melt wiped out 3-cent supply

According to Harry X Boosel, in 1873 the U.S. Mint ordered the melting of any old standard coins then on hand. The branch mints began melting them down in April, including unsold proofs and business strikes. The main mint at Philadelphia began its melts in July of that year. Included in the melt there were virtually all of the silver 3-cent pieces struck from 1863 through 1872. Continue reading

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Eagle a real denomination

The Act of April 2, 1792, established standards for the eagle, half eagle and quarter eagle denominations. The Act of March 3, 1849, authorized the double eagle. The gold dollar, 3-dollar and 50- dollar coins were never officially named other than their denomination. Continue reading

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Morgan $1 legend placement illegal

The Coinage Act of 1873 specified that the legend, E PLURIBUS UNUM, be on the reverse of all coins struck after that date. On the Morgan dollar, it appears on the obverse above the head. The same problem occurred with the design of the Liberty Head, or “V,” nickel. Continue reading

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Anthony dollars promoted by many

Didn’t the post offices and the Army get involved in trying to make the Susan B. Anthony dollars circulate? Continue reading

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Nickel find a genuine double strike

Is this nickel a legitimate Mint product? All indications are that it is indeed a Mint product, double struck, once in the collar and the second time offset toward 6 o’clock. Continue reading

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Dollars in 1962 display totaled 1 million

A total of 1 million silver dollars were displayed. A Nebraska corn crib manufacturer, Behlen Manufacturing Co., filled a crib with the coins. There were 800,000 bagged Morgans dated 1904 and earlier, and 200,000 Peace dollars, weighing 30 tons. Continue reading

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