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Silver, gold mark historic Brexit

The Brexit commemorative coins struck for the Cook Islands by CIT. From left: silver $1, gold $5 and gold $20. (Images courtesy Coin Invest Trust.)

The Brexit commemorative coins struck for the Cook Islands by CIT. From left: silver $1, gold $5 and gold $20. (Images courtesy Coin Invest Trust.)

The date June 23, 2016, is already one for the history books. On that day the people of United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union.

Shockwaves from that referendum still echo around the world. Britain has a new prime minister. And now the first coins commemorating the event have been released.

Liechtenstein’s Coin Invest Trust has struck three coins for the Cook Islands: a 26 mm, 3 gram, .999 fine silver $1; a 11 mm, 0.5 gram, .9999 fine gold $5; and a 26 mm, 1/10 ounce, .9999 fine gold $20. Mintages are 2,016, 10,000 and 2,016, respectively.

All reverses feature a map of continental Europe juxtaposed alongside an oversized United Kingdom. On the $1 and $20, the U.K. has been colored as for the Union Jack. Appropriately, much of Scotland shows that portion of the flag that bears the white cross of St. Andrew on a blue background. The legend reads “JUNE 23, 2016” with an arrow pointing to “BREXIT.”

The obverse bears the Ian Rank- Broadley effigy of Queen Elizabeth II.

The coins were struck by B. H. Mayer’s Kunstprägeanstalt in Munich.

The silver dollar has been minted using CIT’s Smartminting© technology. The gold $20 uses as similar technique that has been dubbed Big Gold Minting©. It enables the ready striking of low weight, large diameter gold coins.

 

This article was originally printed in World Coin News.
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More Collecting Resources

• Check out the newly-updated Standard Catalog of World Coins, 2001-Date that provides accurate identification, listing and pricing information for the latest coin releases.

• The Standard Catalog of World Coins, 1901-2000 is your guide to images, prices and information on coinage of the 1900s.

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