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Preamble highlights platinum Eagles

The United States Mint is accepting orders for the 2009 American Eagle one ounce platinum proof coin.

The coin will be struck at the mint at West Point. Mintage is limited to 8,000 units. The coin’s price will be based on the Mint’s pricing structure for numismatic products containing precious metals. On Dec. 2, the coin was selling for $1,792.

The reverse features the first design in a new six-year program that commemorates the core concepts of American democracy by featuring the six principles of the Preamble of the United States Constitution.

Themes for the reverse designs in the new series are inspired by narratives prepared by the Chief Justice of the United States, John G. Roberts, Jr., at the request of the United States Mint.
Coin designs reflecting the remaining principles of the Preamble will be released as follows: To Establish Justice (2010); To Insure Domestic Tranquility (2011); To Provide for the Common Defense (2012); To Promote General Welfare (2013); and To Secure the Blessings of Liberty to Ourselves and our Posterity (2014).

The 2009 design depicts four faces representing the diversity of our nation, with the clothing and hair weaving together symbolizing the principle, “To Form a More Perfect Union.” A new design element, an American Eagle “privy mark,” has been added to the reverse of the coin. The privy mark is from an original “coin punch” identified at the United States Mint at Philadelphia. The reverse was designed by United States Mint Artistic Infusion Program Master Designer Susan Gamble and sculpted by United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Phebe Hemphill.

The coin’s obverse will continue to feature Lady Liberty – a symbol of vigilance and resolute faithfulness to duty – by United States Mint Chief Engraver John Mercanti.

The 2009 American Eagle one-ounce platinum proof coin may be purchased at www.usmint.gov/catalog, or at the toll-free number, 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468). A shipping and handling fee of $4.95 will be added to all domestic orders. There is a five-coin limit per household.

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