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Hammered gold double estimates

Spink’s Sept. 22-23 London sale saw many exceptional prices realized. This was particularly the case among historical gold where estimates were regularly exceeded and in many cases doubled for a wide range of high quality coins.

For starters, the catalog contained an impressive offering of Tudor and Stuart hammered gold including a large number of sovereigns in top grade.

Three sovereigns of Henry VIII made five figures. Two second coinage examples with a lis over sunburst mintmark, both in VF, fetched $49,291 [£30,240] and $29,340 [£18,000]. The third specimen struck at the Tower Mint and also in VF took $37,164 [£22,800].

In the sovereign price stakes Henry managed to beat off challenges from both daughters but not his son.

A very rare Edward VI second period sovereign with a Y mintmark and showing the young king enthroned had little difficulty achieving $58,680 [£36,000] given its gVF grade.  A gVF “Fine” sovereign of Mary, struck in .995 gold, with a pomegranate mintmark realized $41,076 [£25,200], but a sixth issue example from Elizabeth with an escallop mintmark in gVF could manage just $27,384 [£16,800].

Rare second period Edward VI sovereign in superior gVF took  $58,680. The supporters for Edward’s coat of arms are a dragon from his grandfather Henry VII and a lion bequeathed by his father, Henry VIII.

Rare second period Edward VI sovereign in superior gVF took $58,680. The supporters for Edward’s coat of arms are a dragon from his grandfather Henry VII and a lion bequeathed by his father, Henry VIII.

However, it was the Stuarts who proved the main stars of this sale. Charles I scored the highest price of the day of $88,020 [£54,000] for one of the two distinctly different triple unite varieties of this monarch. That price went to an example showing a superior bust of the King but with some doubling on the obverse. The second coin in which the bust had been composed in Oxford using the old Shrewsbury multiple puncheons failed to sell despite its VF+ grading.

Charles I scored the highest price of the day of $88,020 [£54,000] for one of the two distinctly different triple unite varieties of this monarch. That price went to an example showing a superior bust of the King but with some doubling on the obverse.

Charles I scored the highest price of the day of $88,020 [£54,000] for one of the two distinctly different triple unite varieties of this monarch showing a superior bust of the King but with some doubling on the obverse.

The second coin in which the bust had been composed in Oxford using the old Shrewsbury multiple puncheons failed to sell despite its VF+ grading.

The second coin in which the bust had been composed in Oxford using the old Shrewsbury multiple puncheons failed to sell despite its VF+ grading.

The first of the Stuart kings, Charles’ father James I, also contributed to the buoyant prices when one of his rose ryals in EF took $41,076 [£25,200].

And Charles’ son did not let the family down. He provided a choice and possibly unique milled gold 5 guineas of 1674. This coin was significant for its regnal year edge mark of VICESIMO QVINTO. No previous example of a Charles II 5 guineas is known with a QVINTO edge. As such it was hardly surprising when it soared past five times its estimate to realize $82,152 [£50,400].

A very rare silver penny of Coelwulf II, last King of Mercia had no problem in achieving $29,340 [£18,000].

A 20 percent commission has been added to the hammer prices and is included in the amounts cited here.

Full catalog details and prices realized can be found at the Spink website: https://www.spink.com/.

This article was originally printed in World Coin News.
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