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Where does the ‘Clinic’ column appear?

Currently the Coin Clinic column is being published only in Numismatic News (and perhaps World Coin News?), but not in Coins magazine. When was the last time such a column was present in Coins? Also, does Bank Note Reporter have an equivalent Clinic-like column?

The “Coin Clinic” column appeared in Coins magazine until the death of Alan Herbert in 2013. That is the same year I took over the column in both Numismatic News and World Coin News. Bank Note Reporter doesn’t have a “Clinic” column.

 

I have received about five bills in sequential order with stars. Are they worth anything other than their face value?

You did not identify the series; however, I am assuming you received these recently over the counter at a bank, or from an automatic teller machine. There has been more attention paid to recent bank note issues than in the past. For this reason, there is a greater supply of anomalies such as these sequential replacement notes on the market. Having said that, the notes are collectible, especially if they are retained in Crisp Uncirculated condition. Their value diminishes quickly if even a single corner fold can be seen.

(Image courtesy www.usacoinbook.com)

 

Does the dime of 1916 to 1945 depict Liberty or Mercury?

The official obverse design name is Winged Liberty. It stands for freedom of thought. The name by which it should be called came into question by journalists just about as soon as the coin was released. Among the names used are young girl and classic female figure. The name Mercury may be technically incorrect, but it became the most popular for the coin.

 

Why were no quarters issued in 1931 and 1933?

The economic collapse of the Great Depression is the reason. According to the 1931 Annual Report of the Director of the Mint, “The small demand for coin has made it possible to refrain from filling a number of positions which became vacant.”

 

E-mail inquiries only. Do not send letters in the mail. Send to Giedroyc@Bright.net. Because of space limitations, we are unable to publish all questions.

 

This article was originally printed in Numismatic News. >> Subscribe today.

 

More Collecting Resources

• The Standard Catalog of World Coins, 1901-2000 is your guide to images, prices and information on coinage of the 1900s.

• Keep up to date on prices for Canada, United States and Mexico coinage with the 2018 North American Coins & Prices guide.

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